General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems (GA-EMS) obtained a contract to provide structural hardware for the propulsion engine of the US Navy’s Columbia-class ballistic missile submarine (SSBN).

The single-source supply contract was awarded by the United States Naval Surface Action Center, Carderock Division (NSWCCD).

The task order is under an extensive unlimited supply contract for an indefinite quantity (IDIQ) for Propulsion Demonstration Hardware (PDH).

It aims to build and supply critical components and hardware for existing and future US Navy nuclear submarines.

Under the new contract, the company will provide structural hardware to support the support structure of the submarine’s driving bearings (BSS).

Earlier in March, GA-EMS delivered the first of two BSSs for the first Columbia-class submarine.

GA-EMS President Scott Forney said: “This order includes precision machining of components to extremely stringent tolerances and demanding material specifications, as well as the delivery of approximately £ 10,000 of hardware to attach the BSS propeller already provided by GA-EMS. to the submarine.

“The delivery will meet the shipyard’s schedule for the installation of critical components of the first Columbia-class submarine currently under construction and will provide a production template for these structures in subsequent ships of this class.

Hardware engineering work is underway at GA-EMS facilities in Tupelo and San Diego, while all SSBN construction is underway in Tupelo, Mississippi, USA.

Structural hardware is expected to be delivered early next year.

The future Columbia-class U.S. Navy program aims to design, develop and deliver 12 new ballistic missile submarines, with delivery expected to begin in fiscal 2027.

The future Columbia-class UAV will replace the existing fleet of 14 Ohio-class UAVs.



https://www.naval-technology.com/news/ga-ems-provides-hardware-for-us-navys-columbia-class-ssbn-propulsor/

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