IBM Red Hat has named Matt Hicks as its new president and CEO. Hicks will take over from Paul Cormier, who has led the company since 2020. shortly after it was acquired by IBM for $34 billion in July 2019. Cormier will become chairman of Red Hat’s board, and he and Hicks will report to IBM chairman and CEO Arvind Krishna.

Hicks first joined Red Hat in 2006 as a developer and has held a number of roles at the company during his 22-year career there. Most recently, he was vice president of product and technology, which led him to assume responsibility for Red Hat’s overall product strategy and engineering function.

During his time in this role, Hicks led the expansion of Red Hat’s open hybrid cloud strategy and portfolio, enabling customers to build, deploy and manage applications on-premise, in the cloud or at the edge.

IN message to Red Hat staff, Hicks said that when he joined the company, he never imagined that his career would lead him to this point. However, he warned his colleagues not to get complacent about the company’s recent achievements and that he would spend every day continuing “the fight to make Red Hat succeed.”

Red Hat’s focus on enterprise-ready solutions built on open source technologies like Linux and Kubernetes helped it reach more than $3 billion in annual revenue before it was acquired by IBM, which sought to reframe its own strategy around open hybrid and multi-cloud technologies.

“Open source is already solidly the driver of innovation for the software industry, and Red Hat is the leader in enterprise open source, period. No one does it better than us. We will continue to earn this respected position and strive to deliver open source innovations that make customers successful,” said Hicks.

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

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