In a victory for net neutrality, ISPs agreed to suspend theirs legal challenge to a California law of 2018 that prohibits providers from blocking the service. Telecom groups and California Attorney General Rob Bonta today agreed to end the case, reported Reuters.

It is fair to say that luck is not exactly on the side of the telecommunications industry. Earlier this year, the 9th District Court of Appeal refused to review it ruling that California law be confirmed. And last year, the US Department of Justice dropped its own lawsuit on net neutrality, which the agency had filed during the Trump administration.

“After many court defeats, ISPs have finally given up their efforts to block CA’s neutrality law enforcement. It’s a victory for California and for free and fair internet. ” wrote Bonta in tweet.

After Trump-appointed FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai repealed the agency’s net neutrality rules in 2017, the California legislature decided to pass its own law. The state law on net neutrality, which entered into force in August 2018, extended previous federal rules by banning the use of “zero rating” by Internet service providers in an anti-competitive manner. A zero rating is obtained when an ISP releases any of the related services from eating away at the customer’s data restrictions. For example, AT&T Wireless once released HBO Max from the data restrictions of its Internet customers. The company abandoned the practice last year and blamed the impact of California law. Digital rights groups such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation say the rating is zero hostile for consumers, especially those in low-income households.

Federal net neutrality rules, which were blocked by the Trump administration, have not yet been restored by the FCC under President Joe Biden. This is because the five-member commission currently has one member, which they will need to vote for net neutrality. The agency expects the Senate to confirm Gigi Sohn. But thanks to intense lobbying by telecommunications groups and a number of Republicans (and moderate Democrats) in Congress, Sohn’s confirmation is stopped now.

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