The upcoming ad-supported tier of Netflix may not include a popular feature. The streaming giant has no plans to let subscribers download content for offline viewing at the ad-supported level, according to a report on Wednesday by Bloomberg.

The new ad supported levelwhich is expected to arrive in early 2023, apparently won’t let customers download TV shows and movies to their devices unless they pay for a more expensive subscription.

The removal of the download feature from what will probably become on Netflix The cheapest plan was discovered by a developer, Steve Moser, who was looking at the company’s iPhone code, according to Bloomberg. Moser also found that you won’t be able to skip ads or use playback controls while ads are running, the report said.

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Netflix is ‚Äč‚Äčalso reported not allowing the display of advertisements during children’s programsaccording to Bloomberg Friday.

Competing streaming services Hulu and Disney Plus have too recently announced new ad-supported levels as part of their composition. Meanwhile, the ad-free version of Hulu will increase from $13 per month to $15 per month on October 10, and the ad-free version of Disney Plus will increase from $8 per month to $11 per month on December 8.

Currently, Netflix’s premium option, which lets you have four streams at once, is $20 per month.

Netflix said it is still deciding how to roll out its ad-supported tier at lower prices, and has nothing more to share at this time.

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Correction, Aug. 18: An earlier version of this story had incorrect pricing for Hulu’s ad-free tier. The cost of ad-free Hulu will increase from $13 per month to $15 per month on October 10.

https://www.cnet.com/tech/services-and-software/netflixs-ad-supported-tier-reportedly-wont-let-users-download-shows/#ftag=CADf328eec

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