The winners of the annual eVolo skyscraper competition have been announced. With a climate control tower and tsunami-resistant tall buildings, plus a food production tower, it offers a view of architectural design that is unlimited in practicality.

For those unfamiliar with the competition, the eVolo Skyscraper Competition is less concerned with plans for towers that could ever be built, and instead focuses on highlighting interesting ideas. There is no official main theme to bring them all together, but climate change is great this year, plus there are several designs affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“EVolo magazine is pleased to announce the winners of the 2022 Skyscraper Competition,” eVolo said. “The jury chose three winners and 20 honorary mentions from 427 received projects. Founded in 2006, the annual award recognizes visionary ideas that, through the new use of technology, materials, programs, aesthetics and spatial organizations, challenge the way we understand vertical architecture and its connection to the natural and built environment. “

The three winning projects are shown below, while our gallery has a full list of 20 honorable mentions, including a beehive skyscraper and a tower designed to house flying cars / homes.

The climate control skyscraper was designed by South Korean Kim Gong Jung, Min Yong Gi and Yu Sang Gu. Numerous towers will be built over the oceans and turn seawater into rain clouds to cope with the drought caused by climate change.

eVolo

First place went to the climate control skyscraper, which was designed by a South Korean team of Kim Gong Jung, Min Yong Gi and Yu Sang Gu.

Featuring an unusual futuristic narrowing shape, the idea behind the design is for a number of skyscrapers to rise above the oceans near coastal areas. The towers will then be used to turn seawater into rain clouds, which in turn will encourage rainfall and help drought-prone areas nearby. It will run on solar energy and will include some kind of cloud generator that uses pressurized water vapor.

The Tsunami Park skyscraper was designed by Chinese Wang Jue, Zhang Qian, Zhang Changsheng, Li Muchun and Xu Jing.  Its design is inspired by mangrove forests and will be used to protect nearby communities from tsunamis.
The Tsunami Park skyscraper was designed by Chinese Wang Jue, Zhang Qian, Zhang Changsheng, Li Muchun and Xu Jing. Its design is inspired by mangrove forests and will be used to protect nearby communities from tsunamis.

eVolo

Second place went to the Tsunami Park skyscraper by Chinese Wang Jue, Zhang Qian, Zhang Changsheng, Li Muchun and Xu Jing.

This interesting conceptual design will be built off the coast of Tonga to help protect the country from the tsunami. The skyscraper – really more like a collection of multi-storey stilts – will have an overall shape inspired by mangrove forests. During normal use, it will allow people to live on and around it, with the spaces between its concrete columns hosting tidal fishing. However, when a tsunami strikes, its shape, along with large water tanks, will help reduce the strength of the tsunami while maintaining the safety of land communities.

New Spring: The agro-ecological skyscraper was designed by Michal Spolnik and Marcin Kitala, respectively from Austria and Poland.  It will be made of wood and will contain different types of plants and animal species that will be used to address food shortages.
New Spring: The agro-ecological skyscraper was designed by Michal Spolnik and Marcin Kitala, respectively from Austria and Poland. It will be made of wood and will contain different types of plants and animal species that will be used to address food shortages.

eVolo

New Spring: The agro-ecological skyscraper was designed by Michal Spolnik and Marcin Kitala, respectively from Austria and Poland.

The couple’s project envisages a mostly wooden skyscraper, which looks a bit like a thin pine cone standing upright. It will be used to alleviate global food production shortages by increasing the number of crops and livestock used. The tower will host a number of timber-based modules that serve as experimental gardens, offering scientists and researchers a place to pursue new ideas for reliable food sources in the face of climate change.

Source: eVolo



https://newatlas.com/architecture/evolo-skyscraper-competition-2022/

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