Mike Depatti, a former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly have announced their mansion in Pacific Heights for $ 15.995 million.

Mike Depatti, former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly list their mansion in Pacific Heights. (Photos by Douglas Friedman and Jacob Elliott)
Living room with ceilings with black beams.
Mike Depatti, former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly list their mansion in Pacific Heights. (Photos by Douglas Friedman and Jacob Elliott)

The Tudor-style house, built in 1933, is the original Canadian consulate. The house was later sold to philanthropists Jeff and Lori Uben, who organized a number of fundraisers at their home. A famous guest, Martha Stewart, had a guest room named after her.

Modern kitchen.
Mike Depatti, former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly list their mansion in Pacific Heights. (Photos by Douglas Friedman and Jacob Elliott)
Bedroom with bay windows.
Mike Depatti, former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly list their mansion in Pacific Heights. (Photos by Douglas Friedman and Jacob Elliott)

The 9,125-square-foot home with six bedrooms and eight bathrooms is a mix of original design and modern amenities. It offers hand-carved wooden fixtures and non-standard outdoor hardware, as well as a chef’s kitchen, gym, library and cinema. There is a garage for two cars, surrounding a yard with a fireplace, and the lower level of the apartment has been converted into a one-bedroom apartment with one bathroom.

Home gym.
Mike Depatti, former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly list their mansion in Pacific Heights. (Photos by Douglas Friedman and Jacob Elliott)
Patio with fireplace.
Mike Depatti, former CEO of Kimpton Hotels, and his wife Holly list their mansion in Pacific Heights. (Photos by Douglas Friedman and Jacob Elliott)

Neil Ward with Compass is the listing agent.

Photos: Former hotel chain CEO lists SF mansion for $16 million

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