The Say Survey examines various rankings and scorecards that assess geographical locations, noting that these scores are best viewed as a combination of skillful interpretation and data.

buzzing: There were no evictions of tenants from California in early 2022 – as far as their online search habits show.

Source: My trusted spreadsheet has been reviewed migration statistics for the first quarter from ApartmentList.com. The website analyzes 1.7 million online apartment searches by country, including what proportion of consumers wanted to leave and how much local demand came from elsewhere in the United States

Top line

As I said many times before, few people leave California and even fewer move here.

To begin 2022, 15.9% of Californians looking for a new place to rent look out of state. This is the second lowest share among the states. Arizona was the most popular place for Golden Staters to search for apartments.

And 16.2 percent of California’s rental demands come from outside the state. Again, this was the second lowest share in the nation. And those who follow the feud between California and Texas will giggle that Lone Star residents have made the most frequent out-of-state searches in California.

Details

So where was the first place for “outgoing” relocations – these potential departures from the country?

In the District of Columbia, 71% of apartment seekers search outside the area. Next was Vermont with 55%, Wyoming with 52%, New Hampshire with 50% and West Virginia with 49%.

Conversely, only Florida, with 15.7%, has a smaller share of the look than California. Then came Texas with 17%, Arizona with 19% and Utah with 21%.

Seven states had California as the number one target for residents outside of the state – Arizona, Colorado, Hawaii, Nevada, Texas, Utah and Washington.

Then consider these “incoming” relocations – the places with the most apartment searches that could lead to more new neighbors.

The largest share of incoming reviews is also DC, with 65% of its searches coming from outside the area. They are followed by Alaska and Montana with 53%, Wyoming with 52% and South Carolina with 51%.

The only state with less incoming demand from California is Michigan with 14%, followed by Texas and Ohio with 18% and Illinois with 19%. By the way, Florida was the 10th lowest with 25%.

Six states – Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada, Texas, Utah and Washington – had more Californians looking after their apartments than residents of any other state.

Eventually

Demand is by no means guaranteed relocation.

And please keep in mind that approximately two-thirds of these online apartment hunts are aimed at relocations near the home, within the state.

In addition, some online views are ambitious – people are just dreaming of new excavations.

So you can look at this indicator as something like a criterion for popularity. Think about the ratio of incoming searches in my spreadsheet (think of potential arrivals) compared to her outbound online survey (think of possible departures).

This statistic suggests that South Carolina is the tenant’s best choice. He led the nation with a 196% share of outsiders who want to relocate to Palmetto compared to its residents looking elsewhere in the United States.

The next in fashion, in this math? Alaska with 190%, then Arizona with 173%, Florida with 162% and Kentucky with 138%.

Least popular? Michigan. tenants considering relocating to Wolverine are just 52% of those who want to leave. Then came Illinois with 58%, New York with 61%, Georgia with 71% and Ohio with 72%.

California, just below the 98% average, ranks 32nd, not far from Texas, № 25 with 103%.

Postscript

With all the talk of rent affordability these days, it’s a little surprising that people seem to be looking more intensively in more expensive markets, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s spending data.

Cutting the states in third according to their popularity score, my spreadsheet found that the 17 most modern states have an average monthly rent of $ 1,097 compared to the 17 disadvantaged states at $ 999.

Jonathan Lansner is a business columnist for the Southern California News Group. You can contact him at jlansner@scng.com

No exodus of California renters as 2022 starts

Previous articleSimplilearn Artificial Intelligence Review: Mastering Specialized Skills
Next articleAstell & Kern includes a Kann Max quad-DAC digital audio player